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minimalmovieposters:

Fight Club by Scott O
lucxsrxndle’s request
(tilt your screen back…)

minimalmovieposters:

Fight Club by Scott O

lucxsrxndle’s request

(tilt your screen back…)

tumblrbot:

AFTER CLOSELY MONITORING THE HUMAN FASHION INDUSTRY, I’VE DECIDED TO TRY SOME NEW LOOKS — AND I NEED YOUR HELP.
WOULD YOU PLEASE OPEN THE ATTACHED GRAPHIC IN YOUR FAVORITE PAINT PROGRAM, GIVE ME A FRESH COAT OF PAINT IN A STYLE OF YOUR CHOOSING, AND REPLY WITH YOUR CREATION TO THIS POST OR EMAIL TUMBLRBOT@TUMBLR.COM.
THANK YOU.

tumblrbot:

AFTER CLOSELY MONITORING THE HUMAN FASHION INDUSTRY, I’VE DECIDED TO TRY SOME NEW LOOKS — AND I NEED YOUR HELP.

WOULD YOU PLEASE OPEN THE ATTACHED GRAPHIC IN YOUR FAVORITE PAINT PROGRAM, GIVE ME A FRESH COAT OF PAINT IN A STYLE OF YOUR CHOOSING, AND REPLY WITH YOUR CREATION TO THIS POST OR EMAIL TUMBLRBOT@TUMBLR.COM.

THANK YOU.

robicellis:

Oh man- I really have been half-assing this blog for the past week or two, and I am so freaking bummed about it. Before the store opened I had a million things to do and I was totally stressed out. Then it actually opened and I had a million and one things. And then, as you know, Matt got sick,…

troopswap:

Rocky Agrawal has written a series of articles about Groupon on TechCrunch. His most recent post deals with consumer protection laws and the daily deals industry. Rocky raises some valid points of concern but he skips logical steps by failing to make critical distinctions, a flaw that…

acehotel:

Seattle is where non-conformist music and independent radio took hold, and that spirit has never been more relevant than it is today. We put down roots there with Ace Hotel Seattle, the first Ace ever, and it will always feel like home. The ashen skies, reams of flyer molting from telephone poles and transcendent coffee are indelibly engraved in the narrative tableau of the formative years of DIY culture.
We’re honored to keep the noise alive with our second year of live broadcasts with Seattle’s own KEXP during CMJ. We’re more thrilled than ever to host three days of bands and DJs from independent labels in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, powered by Toyota’s Free Yr Radio. A stalwart of Seattle’s music history, Art Chantry, presents an archival show of Seattle rock posters, Thanks for the Memories. Art’s poster work for emerging 90’s band influenced several generations of graphic designers and exemplifies the strength and dynamism of Seattle’s music culture.
Art is also creating a poster for the Ace x KEXP broadcasts — screenprinted by DL Screenprinting in Seattle, a print shop specializing in artist print editions and show posters by poster artists like Jermaine Rogers, Emek, Brad Klausen, Justin Hampton, Rob Jones and Gregg Gordon. The limited edition poster will be available exclusively at Ace NYC during the broadcasts.
All sets will be broadcast live over the airwaves in Seattle and everywhere else online and via podcast. Keep an eye out here for real time posts, photos, videos and interviews.

acehotel:

Seattle is where non-conformist music and independent radio took hold, and that spirit has never been more relevant than it is today. We put down roots there with Ace Hotel Seattle, the first Ace ever, and it will always feel like home. The ashen skies, reams of flyer molting from telephone poles and transcendent coffee are indelibly engraved in the narrative tableau of the formative years of DIY culture.

We’re honored to keep the noise alive with our second year of live broadcasts with Seattle’s own KEXP during CMJ. We’re more thrilled than ever to host three days of bands and DJs from independent labels in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, powered by Toyota’s Free Yr Radio. A stalwart of Seattle’s music history, Art Chantry, presents an archival show of Seattle rock posters, Thanks for the Memories. Art’s poster work for emerging 90’s band influenced several generations of graphic designers and exemplifies the strength and dynamism of Seattle’s music culture.

Art is also creating a poster for the Ace x KEXP broadcasts — screenprinted by DL Screenprinting in Seattle, a print shop specializing in artist print editions and show posters by poster artists like Jermaine Rogers, Emek, Brad Klausen, Justin Hampton, Rob Jones and Gregg Gordon. The limited edition poster will be available exclusively at Ace NYC during the broadcasts.

All sets will be broadcast live over the airwaves in Seattle and everywhere else online and via podcast. Keep an eye out here for real time posts, photos, videos and interviews.

Thank you, Tumblr (and Twitter, and Facebook)

producermatthew:

After ten months, I’ve decided it’s time to close this project.

Let me explain, in the most ineloquent way possible:

Last year, I was let go from a television station in Northern California. To keep my writing skills from getting rusty, and to keep my sanity intact, I turned to Tumblr as a way to exercise my newsgathering, research and reporting skills. When I started proactively using Tumblr, I had just over 80 followers — most of whom were personal friends. Today, that number is significantly higher thanks to an amazing network of people and organizations that I’ve feel privileged to know.

After covering some incredible stories from December of last year to now — including the January Tucson shooting, the Domodedovo airport terror attack, the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, the Southwest Airlines Flight 812 incident, the non-presidential candidacy of Donald Trump, the death of Osama bin Laden and the failed Harold Camping rapture event — this project not only kept my skills from getting rusty, but it also became an incredible resources for thousands — at, at times, hundreds of thousands — of people during major news events.

This was not only a platform to research and report, it became a platform of experimentation. Sometimes, things worked. Sometimes, things didn’t. B

The project also set the bar incredibly high for the ever-evolving field that is social journalism. I’ve learned a lot about the future of this industry from the time I spent on here, and I hope that I was able to share some good ideas along the way. This was meant to be an honest approach to fact-based social journalism with very little commentary, and I hope that I earned your trust.

So why close down shop now?

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It’s Not Gender Warfare… It’s Math.

annaholmes:

(A shorter version of this piece appears in today’s Washington Post. Photo of Google executive and engineer Marissa Mayer via. Headline via.)

Let’s say I was designing a new piece of software to make my life as a writer a little easier. First, I’d program it count how many characters I’d typed out and in what amount of time, in order to document my productivity on any given day. Then I’d ask it to compare words, phrases, sentences and entire paragraphs from one draft to the next, in order to calculate how much of what I’d written had changed…or stayed the same.

Read More

washingtonpoststyle:

Black cats audition for a part in a movie in 1961.
From LIFE’s photo archive.

washingtonpoststyle:

Black cats audition for a part in a movie in 1961.

From LIFE’s photo archive.

latex-alive:

A user of Peter Wilson’s fonttable package reported an interesting bug in the interaction between it and the Spanish module (if not others) of babel.

Here’s the problem in a nutshell:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[spanish]{babel}
\begin{document}
$\lim x_n$
{\font\x=cmr10\x hello}
$\lim...
What I Learned In Joplin

thedeadline:

I’m going to write this in a stream of consciousness, the same way I experienced Joplin.

It was my first time covering — more accurately, trying to cover — a disaster. The National desk knows I am a weather geek, so I came close to covering the tornadoes in North Carolina in April, and then the tornadoes in Alabama earlier this month. But the timing wasn’t right in either case.

This time, it was. I happened to be awake at 2 a.m. for a 6 a.m. ET flight to Chicago on Monday morning, just 12 hours after the tornado struck in Joplin. While in the air, I wondered if I should volunteer to go there. When I landed, I looked at the departure board and saw that a flight was leaving for Kansas City in 45 minutes. On a whim, I walk-ran to the gate and asked if I could buy a standby ticket. The agent said yes.

Two calls to New York later, I booked the 8 a.m. CT flight. I told the National desk that I’d be in Joplin at noon local time. I had no maps, no instructions, no boots. I had a notebook but no pen.

What I learned: always carry extra pens.

My cell phone was dying, but I reserved a car online before take-off. On the flight, I wrote a blog post about Oprah.

I was in the rental car at 9:45 and on the highway three minutes later. 176 miles to go, fueled by granola bars purchased at Whole Foods the day before. On the way, there was a conference call with the National desk. I was to travel to the ruined hospital and try to interview doctors, patients and other survivors. My worry, of course, was that the survivors would be far away from the hospital.

Monica Davey, a Times correspondent in Chicago, texted me the hospital address. My iPhone, now charging through my laptop, showed the way ahead. But as I approached Joplin, cell service began to degrade dramatically.

I’m aware that what I’m going to say next will probably sound petty, given the scope of the tragedy I was witnessing. But the lack of cell service was an all-consuming problem. Rescue workers and survivors struggled with it just as I did.

What I learned: It’s easy to scoff at the suggestion that satisfactory cell service is a matter of national security and necessity. But I won’t scoff anymore. If I were planning a newsroom’s response to emergencies, I would buy those backpacks that have six or eight wireless cards in them, all connected to different cell tower operators, thereby upping the chances of finding a signal at any given time.

This is my first time coming upon a natural disaster as a reporter. I suppose my instinct should be “first, do no harm.”

Entering Joplin, I drove along 32nd Street, the south side of the devastated neighborhood, getting my bearings, wondering if it was safe to drive over power lines, looking for a place to leave my car. I parked a block from the south side of the hospital and approached on foot, taking as many pictures as possible, knowing I’d need them later to remember what I was seeing.

I tried to talk to a couple of nurses. They said they were not allowed to.

I started trying to upload pictures to Instagram. It sometimes took what seemed like ten minutes of refreshing to upload just one picture.

A view of the north side of the hospital in Joplin. http://instagr.am/p/EoTHO/

What I learned: In areas with spotty service, Instagram and Twitter apps need to be able to auto-upload until the picture or tweets gets out. (I’m sure there’s a technical term for this.)

I walked to 26th Street, north of the hospital, where the satellite trucks had piled up, and found The Weather Channel crew that had arrived in Joplin just after the storm. After interviewing the crew, we watched the search of a flattened house. That’s when I was able to see the extent of the damage to the neighborhood for the first time.

I’m speechless.

Part of me thought, “This is a television story more than a print story.” It was an appeal to the heart more than the brain.

I started trying to tweet everything I saw — the search of the rubble pile, the sounds coming from the hospital, the dazed look on peoples’ faces.

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